John M. Simmons RAD Broke: Reactive Attachment Disorder

John M. Simmons RAD Broke: Reactive Attachment Disorder.

If I Had a Nickel for Every Nickel I’ve Spent on RAD… Oh, if Only…

I try to always provide at least a little bit of help with my articles about Reactive Attachment Disorder. Today, I will fail miserably in that attempt. That isn’t because I don’t want to help. I really do. If only I could help people learn how to help their children with attachment disorders without becoming RAD broke. But I haven’t found the answer to that problem, even in the least. You probably follow my articles. You probably watch the comments. You probably observe people who are RAD broke just as much as I do. In fact, if you are a regular reader of my articles, there’s a very good chance that at some point (if not right now) you have been RAD broke, yourself.

By the time you are finished fighting against the resources of the state, you’ll be RAD broke and the lawbreaker will still be collecting their check and breaking the law.

I would tell you I’m not here to complain, but that isn’t true. Usually, RAD broke comes because someone in a government position breaks laws pertaining to another person’s (or family’s) legal rights. These lawbreakers do what they do without fear of consequence because of personal immunities from prosecution. We can’t touch them. Did you get that? They can intentionally break the law and they can’t be prosecuted! I was taught in school that in the United States, no one is above the law. That was a lie. Let me clarify. Child Protective Services is not above the law. You can sue Child Protective Services. But the people who work for Child Protective Services are immune from prosecution. This makes them individually “untouchable.” Only Child Protective Services (as an entity) is responsible for those person’s individual actions. The individual cannot be held legally accountable. And what does the individual employee care if you sue Child Protective Services? The lawbreaker doesn’t get fined. The lawbreaker doesn’t go to jail. But go ahead and sue. By the time you are finished fighting against the resources of the state, you’ll be RAD broke and the lawbreaker will still be collecting their check and breaking the law.

When I talked with my attorney, he confirmed what I had been told by the criminal. I could go RAD broke suing the state, but the law breaker had no threat or incentive to keep him from breaking the law.

I remember when the situation with my oldest daughter had reached the point where family lives were in real danger. As I talked with the director of CPS in our area, he just told me that I didn’t get to bring Russia’s problems to the U.S. and make them his problems. When I told them that my daughter was a U.S. citizen and that with the evidence we had presented, he was legally obligated to help, he simply said: “I’m not denying that, Mr. Simmons. I’m simply telling you I won’t do it.” When I told him I would sue him, he corrected me. “No, Mr. Simmons,” he said. “You can’t sue me. I am immune. You can’t sue me. You can sue the state of Utah. And by the time you get through fighting the State of Utah, this will all be over, she won’t need the assistance anymore, you will have done no good for yourself, and you will have spent a bunch of time and money for nothing.” When I talked with my attorney, he confirmed what I had been told by the criminal. I could go RAD broke suing the state, but the law breaker had no threat or incentive to keep him from breaking the law.

I’m not saying we shouldn’t be willing to go RAD broke to give our children what they need.

So until the government decides to make people who work for Child Protective Services accountable for their own individual actions, there is little we can do unless we are fortunate enough to work with someone from Child Protective Services who truly wants to help. Sadly, I know that many of you have experienced what I am talking about. Many of you have spent yourselves up to a perceived limit in adopting children. You have then acquired massive debt while getting your child counseling and perhaps, residential care. I have heard so many stories of people maximizing loans on homes and even downsizing houses to get their children help. I’m not saying we shouldn’t make those sacrifices for our children. I’m not saying we shouldn’t be willing to go RAD broke to give our children what they need.

If you know what I’m talking about, if you know someone who has gone RAD broke because someone else is thumbing their nose at the law, please sound off in the comments and share this article around.

What I am saying is that this is the United States and no one should be above the law. I’m saying that everyone should be legally accountable for their individual actions. I’m saying that when parents plan their country-given rights as part of their resources to help children from hard places, that they should have easy access to the resources that are legally theirs. I’m sorry that I didn’t give you anything to help you in this week’s article. But if you know what I’m talking about, if you know someone who has gone RAD broke because someone else is thumbing their nose at the law, please sound off in the comments and share this article around. This situation of legal immunity for individually and intentionally breaking laws is out of control.

Oh, and the good news is that the director of Child and Family Services I dealt with no longer works for that organization. The bad news is that he’s now collecting a pension that he “earned” while blatantly refusing to follow the law.

About the Author

John M. Simmons is an adoption advocate and author of the award-winning novels The Marvelous Journey Home and To Sing Frogs. John performs television and radio interviews and writes editorials to share his experience with special needs and international adoption. He appears at book clubs, and is a frequent guest speaker for various groups to increase adoption awareness. He and his wife have three biological sons and six adopted children.  

*shared with permission

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s